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TAGU Denis

  • IGEPP, INRAE, Rennes, France
  • Functional genomics, Structural genomics
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Educational and work
I really like community-based research projects, and genomics is an arena where we need to be "together" to provide scientific novelties and technical inovation. More particularly, I study insect adaptation to their environment by functional and evolutionaty genomics. I have developped several genome projetcs on aphids and related species. Genomics is nothing without bioinformatics, not only for storing datas but mostly to test new hypotheses, construct gene networks. Welcome to the word of PCI genomics

Recommendation:  1

06 Apr 2021
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Evidence for shared ancestry between Actinobacteria and Firmicutes bacteriophages

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Viruses of bacteria: phages evolution across phylum boundaries

Bacteria and phages have coexisted and coevolved for a long time. Phages are bacteria-infecting viruses, with a symbiotic status sensu lato, meaning they can be pathogenic, commensal or mutualistic. Thus, the association between bacteria phages has probably played a key role in the high adaptability of bacteria to most - if not all – of Earth’s ecosystems, including other living organisms (such as eukaryotes), and also regulate bacterial community size (for instance during bacterial blooms). 

As genetic entities, phages are submitted to mutations and natural selection, which changes their DNA sequence. Therefore, comparative genomic analyses of contemporary phages can be useful to understand their evolutionary dynamics. International initiatives such as SEA-PHAGES have started to tackle the issue of history of phage-bacteria interactions and to describe the dynamics of the co-evolution between bacterial hosts and their associated viruses. Indeed, the understanding of this cross-talk has many potential implications in terms of health and agriculture, among others.

The work of Koert et al. (2021) deals with one of the largest groups of bacteria (Actinobacteria), which are Gram-positive bacteria mainly found in soil and water. Some soil-born Actinobacteria develop filamentous structures reminiscent of the mycelium of eukaryotic fungi. In this study, the authors focused on the Streptomyces clade, a large genus of Actinobacteria colonized by phages known for their high level of genetic diversity.

The authors tested the hypothesis that large exchanges of genetic material occurred between Streptomyces and diverse phages associated with bacterial hosts. Using public datasets, their comparative phylogenomic analyses identified a new cluster among Actinobacteria–infecting phages closely related to phages of Firmicutes. Moreover, the GC content and codon-usage biases of this group of phages of Actinobacteria are similar to those of Firmicutes. 

This work demonstrates for the first time the transfer of a bacteriophage lineage from one bacterial phylum to another one. The results presented here suggest that the age of the described transfer is probably recent since several genomic characteristics of the phage are not fully adapted to their new hosts. However, the frequency of such transfer events remains an open question. If frequent, such exchanges would mean that pools of bacteriophages are regularly fueled by genetic material coming from external sources, which would have important implications for the co-evolutionary dynamics of phages and bacteria.

References

Koert, M., López-Pérez, J., Courtney Mattson, C., Caruso, S. and Erill, I. (2021) Evidence for shared ancestry between Actinobacteria and Firmicutes bacteriophages. bioRxiv, 842583, version 5 peer-reviewed and recommended by Peer community in Genomics. doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/842583 

avatar

TAGU Denis

  • IGEPP, INRAE, Rennes, France
  • Functional genomics, Structural genomics
  • administrator, recommender, manager

Recommendation:  1

Reviews:  0

Educational and work
I really like community-based research projects, and genomics is an arena where we need to be "together" to provide scientific novelties and technical inovation. More particularly, I study insect adaptation to their environment by functional and evolutionaty genomics. I have developped several genome projetcs on aphids and related species. Genomics is nothing without bioinformatics, not only for storing datas but mostly to test new hypotheses, construct gene networks. Welcome to the word of PCI genomics