POOTAKHAM Wirulda's profile
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POOTAKHAM Wirulda

  • National Omics Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Khlong Luang, Thailand
  • Plants
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Recommendation:  1

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Educational and work
Nik graduated summa cum laude from Cornell University with a bachelor’s degree in Plant Molecular Biology. She went on to pursue a doctoral degree in Cell and Molecular Biology at Stanford University. Nik joined the National Science and Technology Development Agency (Thailand) in 2010 and spent her early career working on applying advanced genomic technologies to expedite the development of new elite cultivars with desirable agronomic traits in breeding programs. In 2017, she won the Young Technologist Award for developing an affordable technology for rapid DNA marker discovery. She was also awarded the 2018 UNESCO-L’Oréal For Women in Science Fellowship for her research on coral bleaching.

Recommendation:  1

11 Mar 2021
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Gut microbial ecology of Xenopus tadpoles across life stages

Recommended by based on reviews by Vanessa Marcelino and 1 anonymous reviewer

A comprehensive look at Xenopus gut microbiota: effects of feed, developmental stages and parental transmission

It is well established that the gut microbiota play an important role in the overall health of their hosts (Jandhyala et al. 2015). To date, there are still a limited number of studies on the complex microbial communites inhabiting vertebrate digestive systems, especially the ones that also explored the functional diversity of the microbial community (Bletz et al. 2016).

This preprint by Scalvenzi et al. (2021) reports a comprehensive study on the phylogenetic and metabolic profiles of the Xenopus gut microbiota. The author describes significant changes in the gut microbiome communities at different developmental stages and demonstrates different microbial community composition across organs. In addition, the study also investigates the impact of diet on the Xenopus tadpole gut microbiome communities as well as how the bacterial communities are transmitted from parents to the next generation.

This is one of the first studies that addresses the interactions between gut bacteria and tadpoles during the development. The authors observe the dynamics of gut microbiome communities during tadpole growth and metamorphosis. They also explore host-gut microbial community metabolic interactions and demostrate the capacity of the microbiome to complement the metabolic pathways of the Xenopus genome. Although this study is limited by the use of Xenopus tadpoles in a laboratory, which are probably different from those in nature, I believe it still provides important and valuable information for the research community working on vertebrate’s microbiota and their interaction with the host. 

References

Bletz et al. (2016). Amphibian gut microbiota shifts differentially in community structure but converges on habitat-specific predicted functions. Nature Communications, 7(1), 1-12. doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/ncomms13699

Jandhyala, S. M., Talukdar, R., Subramanyam, C., Vuyyuru, H., Sasikala, M., & Reddy, D. N. (2015). Role of the normal gut microbiota. World journal of gastroenterology: WJG, 21(29), 8787. doi: https://dx.doi.org/10.3748%2Fwjg.v21.i29.8787

Scalvenzi, T., Clavereau, I., Bourge, M. & Pollet, N. (2021) Gut microbial ecology of Xenopus tadpoles across life stages. bioRxiv, 2020.05.25.110734, ver. 4 peer-reviewed and recommended by Peer community in Geonmics. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.05.25.110734

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POOTAKHAM Wirulda

  • National Omics Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Khlong Luang, Thailand
  • Plants
  • recommender

Recommendation:  1

Reviews:  0

Educational and work
Nik graduated summa cum laude from Cornell University with a bachelor’s degree in Plant Molecular Biology. She went on to pursue a doctoral degree in Cell and Molecular Biology at Stanford University. Nik joined the National Science and Technology Development Agency (Thailand) in 2010 and spent her early career working on applying advanced genomic technologies to expedite the development of new elite cultivars with desirable agronomic traits in breeding programs. In 2017, she won the Young Technologist Award for developing an affordable technology for rapid DNA marker discovery. She was also awarded the 2018 UNESCO-L’Oréal For Women in Science Fellowship for her research on coral bleaching.